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MESI Certificate Mindfulness-Based Emotional and Social Intelligence

Mindfulness-Based Emotional and Social Intelligence

The Mindfulness-Based Emotional and Social Intelligence (MESI) Certificate in the WSU Honors College teaches happiness as a life skill and provides Honors students with the tools to improve their performance, relationships, health and happiness. Through innovative coursework, workshops, local and global service projects, and guest speakers, the MESI Certificate trains students in mindfulness, self-awareness, self-management, empathy and compassion and prepares them for a life of personal and professional integrity and engagement.

The MESI Certificate helps students from any major – pre-med to business to criminal justice – improve their marketability and job performance while becoming more compassionate human beings and leaders in their respective fields.

M. Grant Norton

M. Grant Norton
Dean, WSU Honors College

The MESI Certificate will help prepare graduates not only for the next phase in their careers, but for life. Being socially and emotionally aware and being able to manage the stress that is an inherent part of our daily lives will help build resilience, happiness, and a more engaged community.

Lydia Gerber

Lydia Gerber
Clinical Associate Professor
Director, Mindfulness-Based Emotional and Social Intelligence

The vision at the heart of the MESI Certificate is significantly broader and more daring: through mindfulness training, community engagement experiences, and the exploration of current research and age-old philosophical perspectives on what makes for a richer, more engaged life, we hope to support students in further developing skills, habits and qualities that will enhance their ability to contribute meaningfully to their communities. Among these skills, habits and qualities are empathy and compassion, including self-compassion, the ability to truly listen, an open mind, a sense of purpose, and resilience in the face of challenges or, in other words, Cougar grit!

Joanne Kunze

Joanne Kunze
WSU Honors College Alumna

The path to medical school has been stressful. I remember days when my mind would be racing so quickly I couldn’t put all my thoughts into words. My doctor suggested the practice of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR), citing evidence for its use in preventing physician burnout. I took Dr. Gerber’s Honors 390 course in an attempt to find a solution. It was an amazing semester to say the least, and an incredible opportunity for self-improvement with a reaching effect to those around me. My outlook was brighter, my mind was calmer, and my reactions were softer. I’ve discussed my MBSR habits multiple times in my medical school interviews, and the panels are excited to hear about this self-regulatory process and its impact.

The Honors College recognizes that school is more than just a pursuit of knowledge – it is also a pursuit of self.