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Courses in the Honors College

Please note: this list may be incomplete and will be updated with new information as it is received. If you have questions about the following courses, please contact honors@wsu.edu.

A wide variety of course topics are available to Honors College students. Please check back often, as changes may occur until the semester begins. Need an appointment with an Honors College advisor? Stop by the Honors College main office in Elmina White Honors Hall 130 or phone 509-335-4505.

Course descriptions are intended to provide general information about the scope of the class, the name of the faculty member teaching it, credits, and texts. All descriptions are posted as soon as possible the semester preceding so students can consider their options and plan accordingly. Listings from previous semesters are located at the bottom of this page.


Click here for Fall 2020

Summer 2020


HONORS 280.1*
Contextual Understanding in the Arts and Humanities

(Online course – register through WSU’s Global Campus summer 2020 schedule)

May 11 – June 19
Instructor: Annie Lampman

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student

Creative Writing: The Short Story
This course is an introduction to the art and craft of short-form fiction writing. We will read, analyze, and discuss award-winning short stories, complete weekly writing exercises, and write a full-length short story while working to explore and develop short-story craft elements including characterization, point-of-view, dialogue, plot, scene and summary, setting, and the use of metaphorical language and themes. Each student will have their story workshopped with written peer reviews and instructor feedback provided.

*This course qualifies as credit for the MESI Certificate.

Required Course Materials:
Method and Madness: The Making of a Story, Alice LaPlant. ISBN#: 9780393928174


HONORS 290.1
Science as a Way of Knowing
(Online course – register through WSU’s Global Campus summer 2020 schedule)

May 11 – June 19
Instructor: Joanna Schultz

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student. Any B, BSCI, P, PSCI, or SCI lab or concurrent enrollment.

How much wolf is in our dogs?
This summer we will look at the origins of the domestic dog. In recent years, researchers have taken a keen interest in our dog companions for a variety of studies. I am a “dog person”, but as an evolutionary biologist, the wealth of research on domestic dog evolution and artificial selection for the dozens of dog breeds fascinates me. Therefore, we will examine domestic dog precursors, the multiple origins of domestic dogs, and the ancient and recent breeds. However, we will also delve into the co-evolution of Homo sapiens and Canis domesticus, beginning with the ancient relationship between early humans and wolves. Our studies will include selection for canine morphological and behavioral traits and how artificial selection in breeding results in deleterious mutations over time. Other topics, including feral dog populations, canine use in medicine, among others will be discussed. One researcher stated…. the human-dog relationship enabled our society to advance.

 


HONORS 380.1
Case Study: Global Issues in the Arts and Humanities
(Online course – register through WSU’s Global Campus summer 2020 schedule)

June 22 – July 31
Instructor: Sergey Lapin

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student; HONORS 280.

Introduction to Russian Culture, History, and Language
This course surveys Russia’s cultural past and present. This course is an introduction to Russian
civilization, presenting an overview of art, architecture, literature, music, philosophy, and film. In this course
we will place the cultural phenomena into a larger historical context. Examples of Russian culture and
the Russian Religious faith are discussed alongside with daily life and folk beliefs. Also included is a brief introduction to the Russian language: alphabet and elementary reading.

The course format consists of slides, video and audio presentations, assigned reading and online discussions. All materials are in English. No prior knowledge of Russian history, literature, language or culture is required.
Students will utilize research skills developed in Honors 280 and further develop their skills in creative and
critical thinking, information literacy, and written communication skills.


HONORS 390.1
Case Study: Global Issues in the Sciences
(Online course – register through WSU’s Global Campus summer 2020 schedule)

June 22 – July 31
Instructor: Joanna Schultz

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student; HONORS 290, SCIENCE 299, CHEM 116, MATH 182, PHYSICS 205, or PHYSICS 206.

An Investigation of Earth’s Anthropogenic Impacts
The geologic record clearly documents five major extinctions throughout earth’s history. We are now undergoing a “Sixth Extinction” event, caused by anthropogenic impacts. This semester, we will examine climate change and these six extinctions, with particular attention to the Anthropocene extinction event, its causes, rates, implications, and similarities and differences with past extinctions.

Course readings will reflect course content and will be chosen from the primary literature and non-fiction book sources. For example, we will read a chapter from Half-Earth: Our Planet’s Fight for Life by E.O. Wilson (2016) W.W. Norton & Co. or Konrad et al. (2018) Net retreat of Antarctic glacier grounding lines. Nature Geoscience. Vol. 11: 258–262.

We will engage in discussion via Blackboard’s Discussion Thread, watch excellent films on a range of topics related to climate change and biodiversity, and you will have a valuable environmental experience with the Center for Civic Engagement (CCE).

Required Course Materials:
Wilson, Edward O. Half-Earth: Our Planet’s Fight for Life. 2016 W.W. Norton & Co.
978-1-63149-252-5
Kolbert, Elizabeth. Field Notes from a Catastrophe: Man Nature, and Climate Change. 2015 (Revised Ed.). Bloomsbury, New York.
978-1-62040-988-6


HONORS 370/430 (430 for 380 credits)
TAUGHT BY DISTANCE TECHNOLOGY, BY ARRANGEMENT. CONTACT PROF. ANDERSEN FOR MORE INFORMATION.
Meetings:
10:00-11:15AM

May 11-June 19
Instructor: Kim Andersen

Spain and The Fall of Rome
Over the expanse of history cultures and empires have come and gone. What happens when empires disintegrate? While the dynamics of disintegration may depend upon a variety of factors, e.g. internal conflicts and external pressures, the Roman Empire certainly faced external pressures in the form of barbarian invasions culminating in the 5th century. Yet, internal transformation may well have played a role in shaping the empire during the first four centuries A.D. as a new religion grew. How did it gain foothold and transform an empire whose secular and religious traditions deviated sharply from the new organization? The region we now know as Spain will serve as a case study revealing cultural developments and contrasting artistic evidence. In this course we will explore this important history and ponder which lessons may be drawn for our modern world. Final grade to be determined by active participation, written assignments, and in-class presentations.

Required text:
The Fall of Rome: And the End of Civilization, by Bryan Ward-Perkins. Publisher: Oxford University Press; New Ed edition (September 7, 2006)
Other texts handled by the instructor.


 

Fall 2020


HONORS 270.2
Principles and Research Methods in Social Science
Meetings: M, W, F 9:10-10:00am
Instructor: Season Hoard

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student

Research Methods in Political Science
This course is designed to introduce students to the principles and research methods used in political science. Students will learn both qualitative and quantitative methods and apply these methods to study political phenomena. Course readings and assignments will help students develop and practice their methodological skills. Students will identify the research questions political scientists ask, understand the different methods utilized to answer these questions, and critique political science and social science research based on this developing knowledge.

 


HONORS 270.3
Principles and Research Methods in Social Science
Meetings: M,W,F 1:10-2:00pm
Instructor: Lisa Guerrero

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student

Contemporary Issues of Social Justice

This class will serve as an introduction to methodological approaches used in various fields of social theory to examine systems of marginalization and issues of social justice. The broad definition of social theory is a set of critical frameworks used to examine and understand social phenomena. In this course we will focus on how methodologies of social theory in the fields of Ethnic Studies, Women’s/Gender/Sexuality Studies, and Sociology are used to not only understand structures of inequality in more complex terms, but also to suggest ways to pursue changes in these structures that would produce more equality and social justice in our social, cultural, and political institutions.

We will begin the semester with a discussion of central terms, concepts, and debates within the above fields as a means for establishing the terrain of social justice scholarship. We will focus largely on theories addressing the construction of social difference as a means of inequality, the development of identity as a social signifier, the impact of intersectionality in understanding social inequality and social justice, and what purposes are served by the maintenance of unequal social systems. From there we will look at several specific examples to consider how the methodologies used to address systems of inequality shape people’s understanding of issues of inequality and social justice in particular ways, and what types of outcomes are possible from these examinations.


HONORS 280.1
Contextual Understanding in the Arts and Humanities
Meetings: M,W,F 9:10-10:00am
Instructor: William Hamlin

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student

Twice-Told Tales: Classical & Biblical Stories Retold in the Renaissance
This class will explore various important narratives from the Hebrew Bible and the Greco-Roman classical tradition, investigating how they were altered or transformed during the European Renaissance. For instance, in a unit called “Coping with the Fall” we will begin by reading the Book of Genesis and then move to such literary retellings as John Milton’s Paradise Lost and Andrew Marvell’s poem “The Garden.” Similarly, our unit entitled “God + Suffering = The Problem of Evil” will start with the Book of Job and then turn to two English tragedies, Christopher Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus and Shakespeare’s King Lear. A final unit, “Sex, Crime, and Punishment,” will juxtapose plays by Sophocles and Euripides against the famous French tragedy Phaedra by Jean Racine; the focus will be on ways in which people respond to sexual transgression and violations of social taboos. Students in this class will be expected to provide multiple discussion questions, take a number of in-class reading quizzes, write a research-based argumentative essay of roughly 10-12 pages, and complete a take-home comprehensive exam.

Required Course Materials:
Seven paperback books; total cost around $65.


HONORS 280.2*
Contextual Understanding in the Arts and Humanities
(online course through WSU Global Campus)

August 24 – December 11 
Instructor: Annie Lampman

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student

Creative Writing: Fiction, The Short Story
This is a creative writing course that introduces students to the art and craft of short-form fiction writing. We will read, analyze, and discuss award-winning short stories, complete writing exercises, and write two short stories while working to explore and develop short-story craft elements including characterization, point-of-view, dialogue, plot, scene and summary, setting, and the use of metaphorical language and themes. Throughout the semester, each student will have one of their short stories workshopped with written peer reviews and instructor feedback provided. No previous creative writing experience is necessary, although strong general writing abilities are required to do well in this course.

*This course qualifies as credit for the MESI Certificate.

Required Course Materials:
Method and Madness: The Making of a Story, Alice LaPlant. ISBN#: 9780393928174


HONORS 280.3
Contextual Understanding in the Arts and Humanities
Meetings: Tu,Th 10:35-11:50am
Instructor: Kim Andersen

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student

Global Short Stories
In this course we will read a selection of short fiction from across the world. The stories are by authors from Peru, South Africa, Nigeria, Egypt, Brazil, India, China, Japan and the U.S., among other places, and engage different aspects of particular cultural experiences: exile, war, westernization, identities and beliefs. The purpose of our readings, analyses and discussions will be to use these texts as spring boards into discussions of human experiences at the intersection of cultures, not least our own, as we attempt to understand the relationship between empathy and the influence of culture upon human experience. In addition, we will frame our discussions by reading theoretical texts that address the notions of identity and culture. Final grade to be determined by active participation, written assignments, and in-class presentations.

Required Course Text:
Global Cultures: A Transnational Short Fiction Reader, ed. by Elizabeth Young-Bruehl (Weslyan Univ. Press, 1994)
Other texts handled by the instructor.


HONORS 280.4*
Contextual Understanding in the Arts and Humanities
Meetings: M,W,F 10:10-11:00am
Instructor: David Shier

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student

The Good Life
Everyone wants the good life, but what does that really mean? What makes a life most worth living? Pleasure? Wealth? Friendship? Freedom? Wisdom? Power? Compassion? Love? Balance? These are among the proposals we will discuss. Our philosophical investigation into the very concept of the good life will be informed by a number of classical and contemporary readings, with an emphasis on the way-of-life philosophies of the ancient Greeks and Romans such as Socrates, Aristotle, Epicurus, and the Stoics. We will also consider some the ways that literature, architecture, politics, and the arts envision the good life and contribute to it, and the course will include guest speakers from a range of disciplines and perspectives

You will develop your own answers to the question “what is the good life?” Coursework will include essays on the assigned films, two service-learning assignments and a reflection paper on them, a midterm exam, and a “theory to practice” paper in which you’ll write about the week you spend trying out one of the way-of-life philosophies.

*This course qualifies as credit for the MESI Certificate.

Required Course Materials:
Approximately 12 classical and contemporary readings (provided free online)
Four feature films and several short videos.


HONORS 280.5
Contextual Understanding in the Arts and Humanities
Meetings: Tu, Th 4:20-5:35pm
Instructor: Larry Hufford

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student

As Creator: Making a World
This course will use a set of projects and discussions to explore the idea of creativity and how we creatively construct worlds. From quick self-descriptions of ourselves when we meet someone new to the more elaborate worlds that we can create on social media and games or through more traditional means of writing, music, and visual art, we are constantly engaged in the creation of ourselves and the world we inhabit. In this course, we will examine visual arts, literature, social media, and gaming to examine the dimensions of creativity and its implications for our world. Students will conduct creative projects that primarily involve photography, constructions, and writing to present worlds they create during the course.


HONORS 290.1*
Science as a Way of Knowing
Meetings: Tu, Th 2:10-3:40pm
Instructor: Lydia Gerber

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student. Any B, BSCI, P, PSCI, or SCI lab or concurrent enrollment.

The Science of Leading a Richer Life
Cutting edge science claims it knows ways to lead a happier life. What methods are scientists using to establish their claims? What practices, skills and attitudes do they point to as means for achieving this goal? What are ways of testing these claims in our own lives and with the tools we have at hand?

This class will introduce students to the emerging field of Happiness Studies as a gateway to scientific research. Students will critically assess examples of the current state of Happiness Studies. They will explore the relationship between a “rich” and a “happy” life and engage in limited-scale projects to examine whether happiness is indeed a skill that one can seek to enhance in one’s own life. The class requirements include participation in two community service activities under the leadership of the Center for Civic Engagement.

*This course qualifies as credit for the MESI Certificate.

Required Course Text:
There is no textbook for this course. We will rely on published journal articles made available without charge through the WSU Library system.

The Science of Leading a Richer Life
Cutting edge science claims it knows ways to lead a happier life. What methods are scientists using to establish their claims? What practices, skills and attitudes do they point to as means for achieving this goal? What are ways of testing these claims in our own lives and with the tools we have at hand?

This class will introduce students to the emerging field of Happiness Studies as a gateway to scientific research. Students will critically assess examples of the current state of Happiness Studies. They will explore the relationship between a “rich” and a “happy” life and engage in limited-scale projects to examine whether happiness is indeed a skill that one can seek to enhance in one’s own life.

*This course qualifies as credit for the MESI Certificate.

Required Course Text:
There is no textbook for this course. We will rely on published journal articles made available without charge through the WSU Library system.


HONORS 290.2
Science as a Way of Knowing
Meetings: Tu, Th 9:10-10:25pm
Instructor: Joanna Schultz

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student. Any B, BSCI, P, PSCI, or SCI lab or concurrent enrollment.

Title
TBD

Required Course Text:
TBD


HONORS 290.3
Science as a Way of Knowing
Meetings: M,W,F 3:10-4:00pm
Instructor: Julie Menard

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student. Any B, BSCI, P, PSCI, or SCI lab or concurrent enrollment.

History of Space Exploration

Space exploration started long before the first man-made object reached space in 1949, and is still in its infancy. Throughout this course, we will discuss worldwide space exploration in a historical context, from star gazing to landing on a comet. We will talk about the past, present, and future mission objectives of the world’s major space agencies, as well as the corresponding payloads and outcomes.

Students will be tasked, as a group, to plan out a space exploration mission to the planetary body of their choice, including mission objectives and instrument payload.
Students will be encouraged to develop information literacy, and critical and creative thinking throughout the course readings, discussions and group project, which they will present orally at the end of term.”

 


HONORS 290.3
Science as a Way of Knowing
Meetings: W 5:30-8:00pm
Instructor: David Makin

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student. Any B, BSCI, P, PSCI, or SCI lab or concurrent enrollment.

Deconstructing the Black Mirror: Technology and Crime

“The exponential development of technology undeniably shapes society. Problematic to this innovation is a reluctance or inability to consider the direct and indirect impact of technology on society. Through the backdrop of the cult television and cultural phenomenon program “The Black Mirror”, this course examines the development, integration and evolution of technology within society and the challenges and opportunities relevant to crime, the criminal justice system, and public safety more broadly. As technology is interdisciplinary, this course takes a broad approach to the study of technology by examining the social, cultural, legal, organizational, and individual influence of current technology and what future technology integration may bring.

Specific course outcomes include:

  • Illustrating policy implications of current and emerging technology.
  • Explaining the fundamental principles that have shaped the development and integration of technology within the criminal justice system.
  • Describing the development, use, and advancement of technology within public safety.
  • Naming the catalyst events for technology integration in police organizations.
  • Applying critical thinking and analytical reasoning to contemporary criminal justice problems.
  • Showing the external influences for technology integration and explaining the potential consequences for such expansion.

HONORS 298.3*
Approaches to Global Leadership
Meetings: M 12:10-2:00pm
Instructor: Cassa Hanon

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student.

Introduction to Innovation
Organizations are under constant pressure to innovate. Do you have what it takes to be innovative? Of course, you do. In this course, we’ll look at different kinds of innovation and discover the unique personal characteristics you bring to the process. We will examine design approaches and organizational cultures that foster innovation. You will be able to talk about how your strengths and interests can successfully contribute to an organization’s innovation goals. We will also use video conferencing to meet with leaders in a variety of industries around the globe. This course is open to all majors and relevant to any type of organization – large, small, for profit, non-profit, academic and public service.
This course will include a mix of readings, discussion, lectures, videos, and student presentations. Eight class sessions will be held in person, the remainder will be hosted via Zoom.

*This course qualifies as credit for the MESI Certificate.

Required Course Text:
The instructor will make books available for students to borrow.
Introduction to Myers-Briggs Type Copyright 1998, 2015 by Peter B. Myers and Katherine D. Myers, 7th Edition (approximately $20 from www.cpp.com)
Introduction to Type and Innovation Copyright 2009 by Damian Killen and Gareth Williams (approximately $20 from www.cpp.com)


HONORS 370.1
Case Study: Global Issues in Social Sciences
Meetings: Tu,Th 10:35-11:50am
Instructor: Mary Bloodsworth-Lugo

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student; HONORS 270 or ECONS 198.

The Global Food System
Raj Patel notes, “Global hunger and obesity are symptoms of the same problem.” The “stuffed and starved,” he maintains, “are also linked through the chains of production that bring food from fields to our plate.” Barry Estabrook points out, “the life expectancy of a migrant worker in the United States is only forty-nine years, about the same as that of a person living in equatorial Africa.” And regarding access to clean water, Anna Clark conveys, “Monthly water rates [in Flint] were among the most expensive in the country, and yet 42 percent of residents lived below the federal poverty level.” Using a case study framework, we will examine the modern global food system (including access to the world’s water supply) to understand the various issues and inequalities embedded within it.

Required Course Text:

Patel, Raj. 2012. Stuffed and Starved: The Hidden Battle for the World Food System. Revised and Expanded Edition. Brooklyn, NY: Melville House. (ISBN# 978-1-61219-127-0) paperback

Estabrook, Barry. 2018. Tomatoland: From Harvest of Shame to Harvest of Hope. Third Edition. New and Revised. Kansas City, MO: Andrews McMeel Publishing. (ISBN# 978-1449489533) paperback

Clark, Anna. 2018. The Poisoned City: Flint’s Water and the American Urban Tragedy. New York, NY: Metropolitan Books. (ISBN# 978-1250181619) paperback


HONORS 370.2
Case Study: Global Issues in Social Sciences
Meetings: Tu,Th 12:05-1:20pm
Instructor: Bill L. Smith

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student; HONORS 270 or ECONS 198.

The UN and Global Issues
Each section of UH 370 takes a social science-based look at a particular issue. In this section, we will focus on the international system in which non-western nations strive to deal with the west on an even footing. Because the United Nations (and its myriad sub-agencies) serves as the main venue for such interaction, we will use the UN as the primary (but not only) lens through which to view global problem solving throughout the fall semester.

Required Course Text:
Hanhimaki, Jussi The United Nations: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford UP, 2015). (The cost is about $12.)


HONORS 370.3*
Case Study: Global Issues in Social Sciences
Meetings: Tu, Th 2:55-4:10pm
Instructor: Kathleen Rodgers

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student; HONORS 270 or ECONS 198.

Why Does Poverty Exist and What Can be Done About It?
In all nations and across time, a proportion of families live in poverty. The severity of this poverty varies depending on the historical, social, economic, and cultural context within which individuals and families live. Psychologists, sociologists, economists, historians, and policy analysts each provide unique perspectives to explain this complex social problem. In this course, we take an in-depth cross-cultural look at conditions and causal factors associated with poverty, efforts to help poor families and individuals, and the resiliency of individuals and families who face economic hardship in the US and worldwide. Students will examine poverty-related issues such as equity in education, economic inequality, housing, health disparity, mass incarceration and immigration.

*This course qualifies as credit for the MESI Certificate.


HONORS 380.1*
Case Study: Global Issues in Arts and Humanities
Meetings: Tu, Th 2:55-4:10pm
Instructor: Annie Lampman

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student; HONORS 280.

Creative Writing: Memoir & Creative Nonfiction
In this creative writing course we will examine the role of memoir and personal narrative in shaping and defining how we see and experience the world. Through readings and analysis, classroom discussion, and a variety of in-class writing exercises and essay/memoir writing work, we will explore the following questions: As global citizens, how can we represent our own experiences and stories through creative writing in a way that is universally understood and felt? How do we (and the authors we read) define/explore/write about the issues that trouble or fascinate us? What are we (and the authors we read) struggling to make sense of or understand about our own lives and the world around us? Throughout the semester, we will work on developing the basic craft elements of creative nonfiction and each student will have one of their essays “workshopped” with written peer reviews and oral feedback provided. No previous creative writing experience is necessary, although strong general writing abilities are required to do well in this course.

*This course qualifies as credit for the MESI Certificate.

Required Course Text:
“Tell it Slant, Second Edition, Brenda Miller & Suzanne Paola, ISBN#: 9780071781770
Short Takes: Brief Encounters with Contemporary Nonfiction, Judith Kitchen, ISBN#: 9780393326000
Now Write! Nonfiction, Sherry Ellis, ISBN #9781585427581″

 


HONORS 380.2
Case Study: Global Issues in Arts and Humanities
Meetings: Tu,Th 10:35-11:50am
Instructor: Vilma Navarro-Daniels

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student; HONORS 280.

From the End of the Earth: Uruguay, Chile, and Argentina through Film
This is a variable content course. This Fall semester, the course will focus on the recent history of Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay through films made in these countries. These nations have been traditionally considered and named the “Southern Cone.” Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay have many things in common, such as the waves of immigrants that came from Europe, the right-wing dictatorships that ruled these countries in the 1970s and 1980s, and the thousands of “disappeared” political prisoners during those years. Nevertheless, toward the end of the 1980s, Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay celebrated the advent of democratic governments, which have not been exempt from social problems related to the implementation of neoliberal economic reforms and globalization.

Required Course Text:
There will be a set of articles about the films available on Google Drive. Films will be available (streaming format) at the School of Languages, Cultures, and Race Language Laboratory (Thompson 210)


HONORS 380.4
Case Study: Global Issues in Arts and Humanities
Meetings: Tu, Th, 1:30-2:45pm
Instructor: Kim Andersen

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student; HONORS 280.

Classical Short Stories
In this course we will read and discuss a selection of short stories of a multitude of themes and styles by noted literary greats of different cultures, stories all written between the years 1705 to 1923 as included in our textbook reader. Among these great authors we find Daniel Defoe, Mary Shelley, Ivan Turgenev, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Guy de Maupassant, Leo Tolstoy, Oscar Wilde, Thomas Mann, James Joyce, Fyodor Dostoyevsky and Franz Kafka. Apart from extolling the human wisdom embedded in this multifaceted literature, we will examine how these great authors command language in contrasting styles as we contemplate the value of fiction. Simultaneously we will seek input from literary scholarship. Final grade to be determined by active participation, written assignments, and in-class presentations.

Required Course Text:
100 Great Short Stories (Dover Thrift Editions) Paperback – February 18, 2015, by James Daley (Editor)
Other texts handled by the instructor.


HONORS 390.1
Case Study: Global Issues in Arts and Humanities
Meetings: Tu, Th 12:05-1:20pm
Instructor: Joanna Schultz

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student; HONORS 290, SCIENCE 299, CHEM 116, MATH 182, PHYSICS 205, or PHYSICS 206.

Title
TBD

Required Course Text:
TBD

 


HONORS 390.2
Case Study: Global Issues in Arts and Humanities
Meetings: M, W, F 11:10am-12:00pm
Instructor: Raymond Quock

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student; HONORS 290, SCIENCE 299, CHEM 116, MATH 182, PHYSICS 205, or PHYSICS 206.

Mental Health
Mental health is a state of psychological well-being in which people realize their own potential, cope with the normal stresses of life, work productively, and are able to contribute to their communities. Mental disorders interfere with these functions. The topics in this course will 1) provide a scientific background in mental disorders and the psychopharmacology of drugs used in their treatment; 2) discuss the societal impact of mental illness; and 3) analyze trends in addressing the burden of mental disorders.


HONORS 390.3
Case Study: Global Issues in Arts and Humanities
Meetings: Tu, Th 9:10-10:25am
Instructor: Sergey Lapin

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student; HONORS 290, SCIENCE 299, CHEM 116, MATH 182, PHYSICS 205, or PHYSICS 206.

Interdisciplinary research: past, present, and future
It is evident that our society is embedded in an international context that has undergone significant changes in recent decades and will undergo even more transformations in the future. Understanding the interdisciplinary nature of modern sciences has become increasingly important. The main goal of this course is to help students see the real-world relevance of the various academic disciplines and their comparative strengths and weaknesses by looking at the history of several scientific inventions. It is well known that many famous scientists of the past were known as homo universalis, being able to work successfully in very diverse fields. We will then turn to modern society and look at several cases where scientists from different disciplines join forces to address complex global issues, such as environmental, ecological, and global health problems. We will also discuss the cultural and social impacts of scientific research and relations between the liberal arts and sciences. This course is designed for both science and non-science majors and will require student collaboration to understand the complex, interdisciplinary nature of global issues.


HONORS 390.4*
Case Study: Global Issues in Arts and Humanities
Meetings: Tu 5:30-8:00
Instructor: Lydia Gerber

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student; HONORS 290, SCIENCE 299, CHEM 116, MATH 182, PHYSICS 205, or PHYSICS 206.

The Practice, Science and History of Mindfulness
Mindfulness, defined by Jon Kabat-Zinn as “paying attention, on purpose, in the present moment, non-judgmentally,” is an inherent human capacity, cultivated throughout history. Mindfulness training enhances one’s ability to cope with anxiety and stress, decreases the likelihood of burnout in challenging professions, and has a beneficial effect on overall health. Among mindfulness training programs Jon Kabat-Zinn’s Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR), developed in 1979 at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, stands out as a program that has been rigorously researched for its safety and effectiveness. This class invites students to explore the practice (following the program developed by Jon Kabat-Zinn) and the growing field of published research on MBSR in academic disciplines ranging from Psychology and Education to Neuroscience and Cell Biology.

The instructor has received her training in MBSR through the Center for Mindfulness at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. She has been teaching classes in the Pullman community and at WSU since 2012 and is looking forward to working with you! Please feel free to contact her at lgerber@wsu.edu if you have questions about the class!

*This course qualifies as credit for the MESI Certificate.

Required Course Text:
There is no textbook for this course. We will rely on journal articles made available without charge through the WSU Library system.

 


HONORS 398.1
Honors Thesis Proposal Seminar
Meetings: Th 1:10-2:00pm
Instructor: Kim Andersen

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student; sophomore standing.

This is a seminar with the purpose of assisting and supporting each participant in completing his/her Honors thesis proposal. By the end of the course you will be ready to submit your Honors thesis proposal for approval and to initiate your thesis research. In the course, you will learn how to generate an Honors thesis topic, how to formulate a thesis question, how to identify a thesis advisor, and how to prepare the thesis proposal. In addition, we will discuss ways to structure your thesis, how to perform a literature search, and how to evaluate the information you obtain in relation to your chosen topic. During the course we will discuss and constructively support and critique projects as they develop in the proposals. Each student will submit a complete proposal including title, introduction, research question, methodology, preliminary annotated bibliography, as a final product. S/F grading.


HONORS 398.2
Honors Thesis Proposal Seminar
Meetings: W 9:10-10:00am
Instructor: Joanna Schultz

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student; sophomore standing.

This seminar-style course is designed to assist and support you in the development and completion of your Honors College thesis proposal. The course prepares you to successfully complete your final thesis research and presentation requirements of the Honors College. We will perform a step-wise process in the completion of your proposal, from generating preliminary ideas, finding suitable thesis advisors, submitting a thesis draft, which I thoroughly edit from Introduction through Conclusions to assist in your successful completion and submission of a quality proposal. During the course, each thesis proposal will be constructively criticized during collaborative peer review sessions. You will give a 10-minute formal presentation on your proposal in class. Your peers will provide feedback on your proposed research following the presentation. At the end of class, your final thesis proposal will include a Title, Introduction, Research Question/Hypothesis (or Creative Project), Materials and Methods (Methodology), Expected Results derived from your preliminary literature review, Conclusions, and Bibliography/References. You are graded as S/F in this course.


HONORS 398.3
Honors Thesis Proposal Seminar
Meetings: Tu 12:05-12:55pm
Instructor: Robin Bond

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student; sophomore standing.

This seminar-style course is designed to assist and support you in the development and completion of your Honors College thesis proposal. The course prepares you to successfully complete your final thesis research and presentation requirements of the Honors College. We will perform a step-wise process in the completion of your proposal, from generating preliminary ideas, finding suitable thesis advisors, submitting a thesis draft, which I thoroughly edit from Introduction through Conclusions to assist in your successful completion and submission of a quality proposal. During the course, each thesis proposal will be constructively criticized during collaborative peer review sessions. You will give a 10-minute formal presentation on your proposal in class. Your peers will provide feedback on your proposed research following the presentation. At the end of class, your final thesis proposal will include a Title, Introduction, Research Question/Hypothesis (or Creative Project), Materials and Methods (Methodology), Expected Results derived from your preliminary literature review, Conclusions, and Bibliography/References. You are graded as S/F in this course.


HONORS 398.4
Honors Thesis Proposal Seminar
Meetings: W 10:35-11:25am
Instructor: Annie Lampman

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student; sophomore standing.

This is a seminar-style course with the purpose of assisting and supporting each participant in completing his/her Honors thesis proposal. In the course, you will generate an Honors thesis topic, formulate your thesis question, identify a thesis advisor, and prepare you thesis proposal. We will discuss ways to structure your thesis, perform research, and evaluate the information you obtain in relation to your chosen topic. During the course, we will discuss and constructively support and critique projects as they develop in the proposals. Each student will present their proposal to the class, and submit a complete proposal—including title, introduction, research question, methodology, and annotated bibliography—as a final product. S/F grading.


ECONS 198.1
Economics Honors
Meetings: M,W,F 1:10-2:00pm
Instructor: Pat Kuzyk

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student. Enrollment in ECONS 198 is not allowed if credit has already been earned for ECONS 101 and 102.

Principles of Economics

This is an introductory course that covers principles of both micro and macroeconomics. My goal is for the student to learn, rigorously, the concepts that are crucial for her to understand how our political-economic system works. An organizing theme of the course is the question ‘under what circumstances are individual self-interest and the public good aligned, and when are they in conflict?’ Economic theory offers numerous insights into these important questions.

Students will be introduced to the methodology of economic research, and they will learn to apply economic principles to real-world examples.

 


ECONS 198.2
Economics Honors
Meetings: M,W,F 12:10-1:00pm
Instructor: Pat Kuzyk

Prerequisite: Must be a current Honors student. Enrollment in ECONS 198 is not allowed if credit has already been earned for ECONS 101 and 102.

Principles of Economics
This is an introductory course that covers principles of both micro and macroeconomics. My goal is for the student to learn, rigorously, the concepts that are crucial for her to understand how our political-economic system works. An organizing theme of the course is the question ‘under what circumstances are individual self-interest and the public good aligned, and when are they in conflict?’ Economic theory offers numerous insights into these important questions.

Students will be introduced to the methodology of economic research, and they will learn to apply economic principles to real-world examples.


ENGL 298
Writing and Research Honors

Multiple Sections, see courses at schedules.wsu.edu


Current and Previous Semesters

Information about courses from previous semesters is also available: Spring 2020,Fall 2019, Summer 2019, Spring 2019, Summer 2018, Fall 2018, Summer 2018, Spring 2018, Fall 2017, Spring 2017, Summer 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2016.